Born in New Jersey in 1924, Rodenbough’s interest in visual art bloomed early and developed through the
depression years as his father’s employment carried the family from state to state through five different school
systems, settling in High Point, North Carolina for his         high school years. Wartime service began in 1943 upon
graduation when his love of the water led to his enlistment in the U.S. Navy. There Leigh received considerable
training, ending with duty in the Pacific as an Ensign, a Destroyer Gunnery Officer, aboard the USS Ellyson (DMS
19). In 1950 discharge returned him to college where he graduated from the University of North Carolina, School of
Law. A demanding small town law practice, support of his wife and five children, afforded little time for either
drawing or painting.
Nevertheless, after enjoying more than 50 active years as a lawyer and with his children grown, the opportunity
came to Leigh to return to his earlier interest in oil and pastel painting of land and seascapes. Leigh has begun his
artist’s career by dedicating just one day a week to painting, later moving to full-time work as a visual artist.
Over the last ten years Leigh’s work has brought public recognition, as he has placed high in art competitions in
Piedmont, North Carolina, and Southwest Virginia. His work is included in the private collections of North Carolina
Governor Mike Easley and of the Miller Brewing Company. Now residing in Greensboro, North Carolina, the artist
remains close to  his extended family of children and grandchildren.  
A realistic artist, painting daily, he is enthralled with light and line as he renders studies that draw upon a wonder-
filled life of more than 80 years. He especially enjoys that one day a week, spent in intense effort and hearty
fellowship with other artists out of the Rockingham County, North Carolina Studio Group, the oldest organization of
its kind in the State.
Artist’s statement: “A joy not shared dies young.”
                 
LEIGH RODENBOUGH
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